Chilhood Development, in Python

Preface

aka, Learn Python (Computer Programming) by Context.

Audience: Any educator, parent, or individual that wants to better understand programming or what goes into a modern engineer's toolbox and where & when I learned it.

I recently started trying to program for one of the classes I took in college. I just wanted a quick reminder about the course material. Howewver before I could start in on Junior level Engineering I had to 'pythonize' 21 years of learning. Personalyl this is the where all of education is headed.

When I made that that notebook I just slapped together the basics of what I needed, but wasn't anywhere complete. So in this notebook I'm going to try and walk you through "stemmy" part childhood development, in Python. However you don't need to have any prior programming or Python knowledge to follow along. Hopefully somewhere along the way I can give you your Hellen Keller wawa moment about programming or Python.

Methodology

I'm a mechanical engineer, not a doctor or teacher so we'll start with Google.

I'll be 'translating' When to Teach What: A guide for colors, shapes, letters, and more… into Python.

2 years old is a great age for teaching shapes. Start by identifying the shapes you see in the world around you. Your child should have a basic understanding of shapes by 2 ½ years old and should be able to identify many shapes by the time he is 3.

In [5]:
class Shape(object):
    pass

class Circle(Shape):
    pass

class Triangle(Shape):
    pass

class Rectangle(Shape):
    pass

class Square(Rectangle):
    pass

In Python that is everything a 3 year old knows about shapes. Circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares don't really do anything.

A few months before he turned 3, he suddenly got it and learned all of his uppercase letters in about two weeks. The point is, 3 is a good age to teach letters, but do NOT stress and pressure your child to learn them.

In [8]:
letters=["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", 
         "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", 
         "k", "l", "m", "n", "o",
         "p", "q", "r", "s", "t",
         "u", "v", "w", "x", "y",
         "z"]

Again, not very useful. Right now it's just a list of stuff.

They can probabably say them:

In [9]:
print(letters)
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z']

Or count them:

In [10]:
len(letters)
Out[10]:
26

Your child should be able to count up to 20 and identify numbers 1-10 before kindergarten.

In [12]:
for count in range(20):
    print(count)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

[Computers start counting at 0. Why? Because. It's best to move on].